VITELLARIA NILOTICA OF UGANDA

sourced from pristine terroir




Harvested seasonally from 20-year old trees, only at the source of the Nile River – this butter is naturally rich, luxurious, and packed with essential fatty acids, healing allantoin, and anti-aging vitamins A and E. Whereas most botanicals are cold-pressed into oils, Nilotica is uniquely pressed into a soft butter that melts on skin, without the addition of any other ingredients, chemicals, or processes.

LXMI sources the highest-grade Nilotica nuts from the pristine Nile River Valley in Uganda, where local women are known to have glowing skin despite the dehydrating climate.

The rich, alluvial soil of this region lend a unique terroir to our ingredient, earning it the distinction of Nilotica Reserve™. The buttery texture, natural crystals that dissolve on skin, and impact sourcing methods are Nilotica Reserve signatures.

POMMADE DE NILOTICA PUR

A SINGLE-INGREDIENT BALM-TO-OIL THAT DEEPLY NOURISHES THIRSTY SKIN





west african

SHEA BUTTER


"Vitellaria Paradoxa"

West African Shea is popular – more than 45K metric tons are exported annually, and cosmetic companies formulate with the ingredient all the time.

It has a crumbly, cakey texture that requires some kneading to break down, so it isn’t ideal for pure application. When in its ideal state – unrefined – it has a potent odor that can be difficult to mask.

Also, while high in many vitamins and acids, it is relatively low in Oleic Acid, a substance referred to as a “skin permeation enhancer” in scientific journals. This means that the benefits aren’t delivered all that deeply into skin’s surface.


east african

SHEA BUTTER


"Vitellaria Nilotica"

The LXMI team exclusively formulates with Ugandan “Nilotica,” a rare form of soft, delicately scented, luxurious Shea Butter that is underutilized in the cosmetic market, despite its superiority – particularly in regards to skin penetration and vitamin content. The East African shea export market has not matured at the same rate as that of West Africa, for a variety of reasons:

  • • A lower concentration of trees (about 7/ha v. 50/ha)
  • • Local consumption of Nilotica as food and medicine
  • • Higher transportation costs to the West
  • • A lack of stability and security in the region